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Jerusalem Center for Blind Children with Multiple Disabilities

Working Together Towards a Common Goal

Keren Or’s innovative therapies and one-on-one approach make it a unique place, and no one understands that more than the parents who bring their children to our center.

Noam’s Story

Noam

Noam, age 11, like many students at the Keren Or center in Jerusalem, was born blind. He was diagnosed with autism and serious developmental delay. He arrived at Keren Or suffering from a multitude of symptoms brought on by his blindness and mental disabilities.

A Sense of Family

Not everyone can claim that their work place is like a family, but that’s exactly how Michal Shussman feels about Keren Or.

Michal came to Keren Or as an occupational therapy student intern 12 years ago and has been an integral part of the Keren Or team ever since. Michal remembers the power of her first visit to the school.

 

Community and Fellowship

Keren Or isn’t just a center for blind children with multiple disabilities; it is also a center of the Ramot neighborhood community. 

Over 20 years ago, local resident Rafi Cohen and his neighbors approached Keren Or and offered to attend services at the campus synagogue alongside Keren Or residents and their families.

Champion for Children

We all know that Keren Or changes the lives of its students and their families, but sometimes we discover that our work has far-reaching and unexpected impacts. Take, for instance, the story of Miriam Peskowitz. Miriam, a recently retired part-time employee in the New York office, devoted 28 years to making a difference in the lives of blind children with multiple disabilities.

2015 Community Service Award

Jeanette's sons, Steven and Herbert Tobin, attended Keren Or's May 6 luncheon at the Park Avenue Synagogue in New York City and accepted Keren Or's Community Service Award on her behalf. Steven and Herbert presented Jeanette with the award in Los Angeles at the 50th annual luncheon of The Los Angeles Group for the Blind of Israel.